Drug Abuse Posters

0

Over 80% of Fortune 500 corporations now test for illicit drug use before hiring an employee. According to a report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, however, potential applicants who currently use drugs are more likely to apply to smaller companies and hope they aren’t doing background checks.

This same study reports that 1 in 12 full-time workers between the age of 18-64 have used illegal drugs in the past month. This kind of substance abuse costs businesses thousands of dollars every year mostly because these employees are 1/3 less productive and are absent on average five days per month more due to drug use. They are also four times more likely to be involved in a workplace accident and file a worker’s compensation claim. That doesn’t even begin to cover how they affect other employees and raise the level of workplace violence.

According to Tom Lawson, CEO of APSCREEN and an inventor of background checks in 1980, “Drug users have become more sophisticated in their attempts to get around testing when they need a job.” Below are just a few of the ways they attempt to fool the drug test and testers:

1. Rapid Detoxification-According to Lawson, many applicants will ingest anything from high quantities of cranberry to pickle juice, herbal concoctions and other digestive aids to cleanse the system. “However, most drugs contain metabolites that stay in the body for several days and can be detected regardless of what they take to disguise the drug’s profile.”

2. Shy Tester-Some applicants try to avoid the drug-screening by showing up and claiming an inability to produce the required amount of urine. “This way, the tester can try to secure the position first, hoping the drug screen slips through the bureaucratic cracks,” Lawson said. “But patience is a virtue and we make the applicant wait up to three hours and even then an applicant unable to provide a specimen is asked to provide a medical explanation for their inability to void a specimen. The absence of a medical explanation results in a refusal to test which has the same consequences as a positive test.”

3. The Switch-One of the most popular tricks is for an applicant to attempt to submit a ‘clean’ sample which did not come from their own body. “Our process includes a step-by-step authorization, as well as a blood and urine screen, that immediately flags a sample if certain criteria, odd temperatures or unusual activity is noticed.” Lawson said. “We’ve even caught applicants trying to use unique prosthetic devices.” The laboratories test every specimen to determine that it is in fact normal human urine.

4. Pleading Invasion of Privacy-Another common strategy is for an applicant to deny the employer consent to the drug-screening, hiding behind an ‘invasion of privacy’ claim. A strict well-written company policy requiring the testing will hold up in all courts throughout the United States as grounds for not hiring someone or releasing someone from employment. “Besides drug testing, we use every other service at our means to double check the applicant’s use of money, credit, neighborhood references, driving and criminal activities among other ways to identify if the applicant is hiding a problem. When we deliver the complete report, the employer can make an educated decision about hiring the individual.”

5. The Waiting Game-Other testers will concede to the drug-screening but ask for up to 90 days before showing for the test. “This is a red flag that shows the applicant could be ‘dirty’ and needs time to clean up,” Lawson said. “Our process recommends the applicant be tested immediately upon being notified of selection for testing. Any delay caused by the applicant is duly noted and supplied in the final report.”

Over 80% of Fortune 500 corporations now test for illicit drug use before hiring an employee. According to a report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, however, potential applicants who currently use drugs are more likely to apply to smaller companies and hope they aren’t doing background checks.

Leave a Comment

Fields marked by an asterisk (*) are required.